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The List Of 50 Banned Baby Names In Each Country -Part 2

The best think as a couple or a single parent after giving birth to a bouncing baby, it is giving him or her a name, and you need all the freedom and privileges to choose whatever name that suits well your baby.

But that might not be close to false, in the following countries, these 50 baby names were banned by the government body responsible for registering new births.

Check them out below

Malaysia

On the list of unacceptable names are animals, insults, numbers, royal or honorary names, and food

Slide 6 of 11: <strong> Malaysia</strong><p> Malaysia <a href="http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/asia-pacific/5229060.stm">has a list of names it considers "undesirable"</a> and that are subsequently banned.</p><p> On the list of unacceptable names are animals, insults, numbers, royal or honorary names, and food.</p>

Iceland

The names should be submitted 6 months before birth, and each name should comply with their language grammar, linguistic and tradition.

So, for example, if a name contains a letter that does not appear in the Icelandic alphabet (the letters C, Q, and W, for example), the names are banned.

Slide 5 of 11: <strong> Iceland</strong><p> Unless both parents are foreign, parents in Iceland <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/world/2014/jun/26/iceland-strict-naming-convention-cardew-family"> must submit their child's name</a> to the National Registry within six months of birth. If the name is not on the registry's list of approved names, parents must seek approval of the name with the Icelandic Naming Committee.</p><p> About <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/world/2014/jun/26/iceland-strict-naming-convention-cardew-family"> half of the names submitted</a><a href="https://www.nordicnames.de/wiki/List_of_rejected_Icelandic_male_names"> get rejected</a> for violating Iceland's strict naming requirements. Among these requirements, names must be capable of having Icelandic grammatical endings, may not conflict with the linguistic structure of Iceland, and should be written in accordance with the ordinary rules of Icelandic orthography.</p><p> So, for example, if a name contains a letter that does not appear in the Icelandic alphabet (the letters C, Q, and W, for example), the names are banned.</p>

Germany

Focus on humiliation of the child. Including: no gender-neutral names; no last names, names of objects, or names of products as first names.

Slide 4 of 11: <strong> Germany</strong><p> Germany has <a href="http://mentalfloss.com/article/25034/8-countries-fascinating-baby-naming-laws"> a number of baby-naming restrictions</a>, including: no gender-neutral names; no last names, names of objects, or names of products as first names; and no names that could negatively affect the child's well-being or <a href="http://mentalfloss.com/article/68768/22-outlawed-baby-names-around-world"> lead to humiliation</a>.</p>

France

If the name would lead to a lifetime mockery, it would be banned by courts

Slide 3 of 11: <strong> France</strong><p> In France, local birth certificate registrars <a href="http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2015/01/26/france-baby-name-nutella_n_6547254.html"> must inform their local court</a> if they feel a baby name goes against the child's best interests.</p><p> The court can then ban the name if it agrees, and <a href="http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3273214/French-couple-banned-calling-son-Prince-William-Court-rules-giving-child-lead-lifetime-mockery.html"> will do so</a> especially if it feels the name could lead to a lifetime of mockery.</p>

Denmark

If your name can not make a cut in the  list approved by Copenhagen University’s Names Investigation Department and at the Ministry of Ecclesiastical Affairs.

And so far, 20% have been reported to have missed the cut.

Slide 2 of 11: <strong> Denmark</strong><p> Denmark has a list of about 7,000 approved baby names, and if your name choice doesn't make the cut, <a href="http://www.nytimes.com/2004/10/08/world/europe/jens-and-vita-but-molli-danes-favor-common-names.html"> you have to seek permission and have your name choice reviewed</a> at Copenhagen University's Names Investigation Department and at the Ministry of Ecclesiastical Affairs.</p><p><a href="http://www.nytimes.com/2004/10/08/world/europe/jens-and-vita-but-molli-danes-favor-common-names.html"> More than 1,000 names are reviewed every year</a>, and almost 20% are rejected, mostly for odd spellings.</p>

 

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