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The List Of 50 Banned Baby Names In Each Country -Part 1

The best think as a couple or a single parent after giving birth to a bouncing baby, it is giving him or her a name, and you need all the freedom and privileges to choose whatever name that suits well your baby.

But that might not be close to false, in the following countries, these 50 baby names were banned by the government body responsible for registering new births.

Check them out below

Sweden

Parents are required to submit the names of their kids 3 months before to the Swedish Tax Agency and could face fines for failing to register a name.

Slide 11 of 11: <strong> Sweden</strong><p><a href="https://mom.me/baby/7123-banned-baby-names-around-world/item/sweden/"> Sweden bans first names</a> that could cause offense to others or discomfort for the one using it.</p><p> It bans other names that would be considered obviously unsuitable as a first name.</p><p> Parents must submit the proposed name of their child within three months of birth to the Swedish Tax Agency and could face fines for failing to register a name.</p>

Saudi Arabia

It has banned names it considers “too foreign,” inappropriate, blasphemous or not just inline with tradition

Slide 10 of 11: <strong> Saudi Arabia</strong><p><a href="http://www.huffingtonpost.ca/2015/11/09/banned-baby-names-saudi-arabia_n_8512596.html"> The Saudi government has banned</a> more than 50 names it deems "too foreign," inappropriate, blasphemous, or <a href="https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/worldviews/wp/2014/03/16/why-did-saudi-arabia-ban-51-baby-names/"> not in line with the country's social</a> or religious traditions.</p>

Portugal

The names are required to be traditionally Portuguese, gender-specific, and full, meaning no nicknames.

To make things easier on parents, the country offers an 82-page list of names that denotes which are accepted and which are not.

Slide 9 of 11: <strong> Portugal</strong><p> In Portugal, <a href="http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/04/24/banned-baby-names_n_5134075.html"> children's names must be</a> traditionally Portuguese, gender-specific, and full, meaning no nicknames.</p><p> To make things easier on parents, the country offers <a href="http://www.irn.mj.pt/IRN/sections/irn/a_registral/registos-centrais/docs-da-nacionalidade/vocabulos-admitidos-e/"> an 82-page list of names that denotes which are accepted and which are not</a>.</p>

New Zeeland

They just require names with less than 100 characters, besides they should have a clear cut meaning

Slide 8 of 11: <strong> New Zealand</strong><p> In New Zealand, <a href="http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/7522952.stm">parents are barred</a> from giving names that would cause offense, that are longer than 100 characters, or <a href="http://www.cnn.com/2013/05/01/world/asia/new-zealand-stange-baby-names/"> that resemble an official title and rank</a>.</p>

Mexico

The law passed on Sonora, Mexico, explicitly bans 61 first names that are either considered derogatory, lacking in meaning, or mockable.

It prevents kids from being bullied via their names

 

Slide 7 of 11: <strong>Mexico</strong><p>A law passed in Sonora, Mexico, <a href="http://bigstory.ap.org/article/mexico-state-bans-odd-names-including-facebook"> explicitly bans 61 first names</a> that are either considered derogatory, lacking in meaning, or mockable.</p><p>Authorities say <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/world/2014/feb/12/mexico-sonora-parents-prevented-law-naming-children"> the objective</a> is to protect children from being bullied because of their name.</p>

 

Click Here For Part 2

 

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